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January 16th, 2014 at 10:45 am

12 world changing predictions for 2014

The world will look very different a year from now.

It is never easy forecasting the future. We are living in a world in which the pace of innovation and scientific discovery makes reality seem more and more like science fiction. In the next year, those lines will get even more blurred: Think electronic pills that beam your vitals to your doctor, a drone swooping from the sky to save lives in a disaster, or even a fundamental rethinking of how businesses relate to society.

 

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October 9th, 2013 at 12:24 pm

The next frontier in cybercrime? Your body

Advances in healthcare mean that in-body devices to treat chronic conditions, or even just make you perform better as a human being, are not as far away as you might imagine.  Some of these innovations already exist.

 

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June 20th, 2013 at 8:02 am

Giant holograms offer medical students more memorable classes

The project’s creators say their “holograms” are more memorable than two dimensional slides.

Two London-based junior doctors have pioneered a system which uses an illusionary effect to help medical students master their subject.

 

 

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June 4th, 2013 at 10:42 am

Colonoscopies explain why the U.S. leads the world in healthcare expenditures

A recent colonoscopy for Deirdre Yapalater’s at a surgical center near her home on Long Island went smoothly: she was whisked from pre-op to an operating room where a gastroenterologist, assisted by an anesthesiologist and a nurse, performed the routine cancer screening procedure in less than an hour. The test found nothing worrisome but racked up what is likely her most expensive medical bill of the year: $6,385.

 

 

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May 25th, 2013 at 11:48 am

Doctor’s save baby’s life with a 3D printed trachea splint

3D printed trachea splint

The life of a baby in Michigan was saved by the insertion of a 3-D printed trachea at two months old. The baby was diagnosed with tracheobronchomalacia, a condition in which the airways collapse, not allowing oxygen to enter the lungs.

 

 

 

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May 15th, 2013 at 8:19 am

When will your doctor start wearing Google Glass?

Google Glass holds a lot of promise in the medical field.

Google Glass uses augmented reality and voice activation to project data into our field of vision.  The technology Google Glass is using is still in its early stages, but it holds a lot of promise in the medical field.

 

 

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April 8th, 2013 at 10:03 am

The smartphone physical: Medical checkups of the future

The smartphone-enabled checkup will actually improve doctor-patient relationships.

Can you imagine a comprehensive, clinically relevant well-patient checkup using only smartphone-based devices? The data obtained during the checkup is immediately readable and fully uploadable to an electronic health record. The patient understands – and even participates – in the interaction far beyond faking a cough and gulping a deep breath.

 

 

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March 26th, 2013 at 11:01 am

The startling rise in disability in the US: 14 million Americans can’t work

Every month, 14 million Americans get a disability check.

The number of Americans who are on disability has skyrocketed in the past thirty years. Medical advances have allowed many more people to remain on the job, and new laws have banned workplace discrimination against the disabled, but disability is still on the rise. Fourteen million people now get a disability check from the government every month.

 

 

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March 21st, 2013 at 11:23 am

New protein discovery could change biotech forever

The quest started with trying to make better yogurt.

Bacteria that uses a tiny molecular machine to kill attacking viruses could change the way that scientists edit the DNA of plants, animals and fungi, revolutionizing genetic engineering. The protein, called Cas9, is quite simply a way to more accurately cut a piece of DNA.

 

 

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March 5th, 2013 at 12:55 pm

Baby born with HIV cured with aggressive drug treatment

Deborah Persaud of Johns Hopkins University presented the results at a conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

For the very first time, a baby born with HIV has reported to have been cured at age 2 1/2 through an aggressive drug treatment with antiretroviral drugs.

 

 

 

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