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Which 5 jobs will robots take first?

February 27th, 2017 at 9:32 am » Comments Off

In 2012, Futurist Thomas Frey predicted that 2 billion jobs would disappear by 2030, roughly half of all jobs that exist today. Oxford University researchers reinforced this with their estimates that 47 percent of U.S. jobs could be automated within the next two decades. But which ones will robots take first? First, we should define […]



Inside the Mind of a Futurist – April 10-14, 2017

February 25th, 2017 at 12:19 pm » Comments Off

A little over two years ago I mentioned a new anticipatory thinking tool I’ve developed called “situational futuring.” It helps me gain better insight into the world ahead. Until now I hadn’t given too many details about how it worked, but I recently decided to reveal the entire process and how to apply it. While I’ve been very […]



How Japan can solve its huge sex problem

February 21st, 2017 at 11:44 am » Comments Off

It’s the kind of stat you might casually tell a friend at a bar: For the last six years, Japan has sold more adult diapers than baby diapers. But Japan’s fertility problems are far more grave than toilet-related trivia. Over the last decade, Japan has seen its elderly population swell, new family-planning stall, and its economy shrink because of persistently low […]



This robot will draw anything you do

February 17th, 2017 at 11:55 am » Comments Off

Line-us is by far the cutest drawing robot we’ve ever seen. Currently raising funds on Kickstarter, this little bot is essentially a USB-powered arm that connects to an app on your tablet or smartphone and copies anything you draw in real time. (The software also works on Macs and PCs.) You can use it to just play […]



Scientists find a way to turn hydrogen into a metal

February 15th, 2017 at 3:50 pm » Comments Off

It’s not every day that scientists are able to create an entirely new substance, but Harvard researchers managed to do just that, and in the process created what could be a world-changing material with a bunch of different applications. It’s called atomic metallic hydrogen, and it’s exactly what it sounds like: hydrogen in the form of metal. […]



The patent bubble is ready to pop

January 18th, 2017 at 3:04 pm » Comments Off

I’m certainly not going to win any popularity contests for writing this article.  The last thing anybody wants to talk about after a presidential election is a patent bubble.  After all, most of us took a nice stock market beat down during the recent housing bubble and mortgage crisis.



IBM releases the annual five innovations that will change our lives within five years

January 11th, 2017 at 12:51 pm » Comments Off

Imagine that you could have superhero vision, seeing in not only what we know as the visible spectrum, but using wavelengths that allow you to see through fog, and detect black ice. Or imagine a Star Trek-like medical tricorder that could take a tiny bit of body fluid and determine what was ailing you.



The human body’s 79th organ?

January 10th, 2017 at 11:12 am » Comments Off

To the 78 organs that make up the human body, a group of scientists says we should add one more: the mesentery. Located in our abdominal cavity, the mesentery is a belt of tissue that holds our intestines in place. While anatomists knew it was there, it was always thought to be composed of several different […]



AI will generate new cancer drugs

January 4th, 2017 at 1:45 pm » Comments Off

Scientists at the Pharmaceutical Artificial Intelligence (pharma.AI) group of Insilico Medicine, Inc, today announced the publication of a seminal paper demonstrating the application of generative adversarial autoencoders (AAEs) to generating new molecular fingerprints on demand.



Scientists can identify unique “breathprint” of diseases

January 3rd, 2017 at 4:19 pm » Comments Off

A team of international researchers recently unveiled a nano array that can identify the chemical signatures of 17 different diseases, possibly bringing us closer to the day when doctors might be able to use a medical tricorder a la Star Trek to instantly diagnose a patient’s conditions.



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