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August 3rd, 2014 at 8:33 am

No Homework! Why Finland’s school system is the best in the world

schoolwork

Homework is rarely given until students are teenagers.

Our education system is failing our students. There are also a lot of different options presented on how to ‘fix’ it. Everyone has an answer, a promising new way of thinking, a potential magic bullet. Inevitably, we also examine school systems that are working as a part of investigating what to do or not to do with our own. (Infographic)

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And one of those that is working and is almost always mentioned is Finland. Their students regularly top the charts on global education metrics despite a lack of homework and more away-from-the-desk time during the school day. No homework is a pretty drastic measure in most people’s minds, so how does it work?

The handy infographic below takes a look at why homework doesn’t seem to be a necessity given the structure of the rest of the system. Do you think a Finland-esque education system would work here in the US?

There’s No Homework in Finland

  • Finland boasts a 93% high school graduation rate (78% in Canada and 75% in the US)
  • 2 in 3 students go on to college
  • The mean PISA score in Finland is 20+ points higher than the next highest scoring country (Hong Kong)
  • The ratio of teachers to students is 1:12 (compared with 1:24 in New York city, for example)
  • There are no separate classrooms for accelerated or special education
  • 1 in 3 students receives some sort of special assistance in school
  • Standardized testing is minimized: only one test is taken at age 16
  • Students get about 75 minutes of recess per day
  • Homework is rarely given until students are teenagers
  • All teachers have a Master’s degree, which is subsidized by the state
  • Only the top 10% of students are accepted into teaching programs
  • Teachers are held in the same esteem as doctors and lawyers

finland infographic

Photo credit: Newsday

Via Edudemic

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