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September 30th, 2008 at 6:38 pm

WaterMill: An Appliance for Creating Fresh Drinking Water from Thin Air

WaterMill: An Appliance for Creating Fresh Drinking Water from Thin Air

No plumbing necessary, fresh water as needed

The Watermill is a glorified dehumidifier that pulls water from the air and purifies it to drinking quality. Technically speaking, the WaterMill is an atmospheric water collection device that condenses water vapor and purifies it.

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WaterMill: An Appliance for Creating Fresh Drinking Water from Thin Air

The system draws in moist, outside air through an air filter. The moist air passes over a cooling element, condensing the moist air into water droplets. This water is then collected, passed through a specialized carbon filter and is then exposed to an ultraviolet sterilizer, eliminating bacteria.

Once drinking water is created, it goes to the point of use devices in your home: your refrigerator, spigot, water cooler or backsplash dispenser.
The WaterMill is designed for home use, producing enough water for a family to drink and cook with every day.

Inside air is up to 70 times more polluted than outside air. The WaterMill is installed unobtrusively on the outside of your home, using outside air, so it won’t dry out the air you breathe in your home. And don’t worry if your outdoor air is less than pristine – even if you live in a crowded city, the Watermill’s filtration system ensures your drinking water will be clean and free of toxins and bacteria – more pure than tap water or even spring water.

The WaterMill can be connected directly to your sink, an existing bottled water system, your refrigerator, or a custom dispenser.

It is designed to minimize energy use. It’s so efficient that producing one liter of water costs only three to four cents. Alternative bottled water systems typically cost ten cents per liter or more.

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